Saturday, April 6, 2013

The Old Log Cabin

A while back we looked at the history surrounding Daniel Schaefer's Old Log Cabin; http://www.westernwhiskeytooltopgazette.com/2010/04/and-then-there-were-three.html.
 
The Log Cabin figured prominently in 19th century lore and a few whiskey companies capitalized on it's nostalgic popularity. In addition to the Goldschmidt / Schaefer  fifth from L.A., Kuhls Schwarke from S.F. distributed their Log Cabin brand in a clear picture cylinder fifth. A Log Cabin Liquor Store, located up in Spokane Wa. had a clear half gallon megaphone made to hold their wares (probably tokay, angelica or port wine). And so, by all accounts, three different whiskey bottles graced the shelves on the west coast with the log cabin theme.

Go withs are a fun "side track" that a lot of us have taken over the years. Shot glasses, tokens, playing cards, cork screws and a myriad of other gimmicks, Jim cracks, gee gaws and do dads were made to familiarize the drinking public with the seemingly endless variety of whiskies available. I'm as guilty as the next guy and am always keeping an eye out for the oddball, one off, goodie to sit next to a bottle.

Recently, I picked up something that I'd never seen or even heard of. Yep, you guessed it, a Log Cabin; a real honest to goodness California Log Cabin. And it's made of redwood! Says so right on the label! It also reads, Delaney and Young / Eureka Calif., just like the whiskey bottle.
 
 

 
 
 
 
Delaney and Young are known for their scarce amber fifths. One's a corker, the other has a Riley inside thread closure.
 
 








They set up shop in Eureka Ca. around 1905, first as liquor dealers. As was so often the case, they broadened their lines to include beer, soda, and cigars, By the time 1919 (and prohibition) rolled around, they had focused their efforts on the soft drink market and were able to survive well into the Roaring Twenties.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Your guess is as good as mine about the age of this log cabin, and what it may have contained. It measures 7" wide by about 4 3/4" deep and is about 4" tall at the ridge line. It's hinged to allow the roof to swing back and, at least to me, is a perfect candidate for a cigar box nomination.










And what a perfect compliment to a glass or two of whiskey; yep a fine cigar really puts the finish on a relaxing evening in the parlor, next to a crackling fire, with my old dog and a couple of friends!

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